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a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
, their jobs, their civil rights and civil liberties -- someone who believes we can breakthrough the stalemate and suspicion that grip us in our policies abroad, if that is what they mean by liberal, then i'm proud to say i'm a liberal. as andrew and stephen write in their introduction to their father's letters, arthur schlessinger jr. helped kennedy craft those words. the letters, which are a marvelous book, chronicles the late historian's views really from world war for through the -- world war ii through the second iraq war. you can read letters from adelaide stevenson, john kennedy, robert kennedy, henry kissinger, william f. buckley jr., al gore, gore vidal, jacqueline kennedy and naturally -- given arthur's interest in american history -- groucho marx, sammy davis jr. and bianca jagger. alexandra, arthur's wife, is not here, so we can mention that one. to a detractor who accused arthur of being a communist sympathizer, he wrote: the facts i have cited should relieve your mind. if not, i can only commend you to the nearest sigh psychiatris. [laughter] i should note quickly that arthur had
there is no civil rights struggle going on this country to make sure that poor people have lawyers. but it's something i really didn't understand when i started as a public defender. i started in a well resource office with manageable case loads and i was able to give clients with a gideon vision and then i moved to georgia for the statewide public defenders system in georgia and then i moved to new orleans in the wake of katrina to help rebuild that office and started to see what i experience nd dc was the exception and not the rule. for example i remember walking into a courtroom in new orleans, very first time ever walked into a courtroom in new orleans and there were people everywhere. people in suits you didn't know who the defenders were, you didn't know who the prosecutors were and you knew who the clients were because they were shackled on the seats. the judge started calling names and in the next second he would call another name and you heard voices, that would be the voice speaking for the person. a lawyer never stood next to the client and then the judge calls a name and there
it's very exciting to see everybody talking about civil rights litigate or heroes which i think they are. >> what is next in the film and what do you see for film and how do people learn more about it. >> the film will be on hbo in july in the summer series which is great because they do a lot of marketing. we are selecting the open night. which is a thousand seat audience. it is the premier selection. it's at the film festival as it went to sundance and they voted it and it's a film we would like to bring home. we are doing as many film festivals as we can. we won the audience award and jury award in miami and doing as many speaking and community talk back events. the film i hope will become a gathering point for people to use and say this is what's happening in our jurisdiction. this shows the experience of just a few lawyers. there are many people struggling to do a great job across the country. >> what's your website? >> we'll be taking questions. now let's move to john rapping who is one of the individuals featured in the film. john, i remember when you first talked about s
is something like this. >> stuff that's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. >> okay. is that a fair comparison? we're going to report and you're going to decide. how does the "duck dynasty" family celebrate christmas? the ladies, miss kay, cory, missy and jessica join us live next from west monroe, louisiana. ♪ ♪ before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than ht on time each month. tracey got the bankamericard better balance rewards credit card, which fits nicely with everything else in life she has to balance. that's the benefit of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. at any minute... ...you could be a victim of fraud. most people don't even know it. fraud could mean lower credit scores, higher loan rates... ...and maybe not getting the car you want. it's a problem waiting to hapn. check your credit score, check your credit repo, at experian.com america's numb one provider of online credit rorts an
john lewis, democrat of georgia and civil rights leader. mr. lewis, thank you for being with us here tonight on this historic day. >> thank you very much, rachel, for having me, and thank you nar rich history, telling the story, what happened and how it happened. it is very moving. >> i have to ask, after your long career, especially as a young man in the south, in the american civil rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work inform your own? what has he meant to you over the years? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> well, the leadership, the vision, the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said, if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle and when i met him for the first time. he said to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what
of the years he now was experiencing. >> i was so struck by john lewis saying that as a young civil rights leader and activist, he was so influenced -- he and his fellow college students saying they were so influenced by mandela and mandela saying when they met that he had been following the civil rights movement in the united states. you were front and center as part of that movement, the civil rights movement here. you had that experience also in talking to him, the cross-fertilization of these freedom movements. >> yes, i think they fed off of each other. i think while the united states civil rights movement came of age and its victory much earlier than the apartheid struggle, they were very much alike. i think that's what enabled me, i think, to have the success to the extent i did to have it. i didn't go as a journalist going in an objective way, i was informed by the experiences we had in the south and in the united states. so when i got there, i understand. there were significant differences. in south africa the majority were the black people and they had been suppressed by a minori
district. i have always been passionate about civil rights, equality for everyone. i have a 10-year-old daughter, so having a girl has made me much more sensitive to gender equality issues. i guess i have always been vocal about my politics, but as a supervisor, i have to listen to other perspectives and making decisions. >> very soon there will be of much more seniors in that area. we are trying to focus on whether a stop sign or stoplight might help. >> tried to look at issues of senior nutrition programs, alzheimer's research, even housing policies that allowed our buildings to become more senior-friendly. also looking at how to support senior services, neighborhood- by-neighborhood programs that allow aging in place. people who are getting older helping each other stay in their homes and communities longer so that they can contribute as long as possible, as opposed to institutionalizing them. >> i support working families, livable communities, definite drawn support for the small business. even in my district, there are pockets of poverty and many people of work. so it is also a
rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work form your own? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. and when i met him for the first time, he said to me, john lewis, i noknow all about you. i follow you. you inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they h
as a young man in if south and the american civil rights movement, how did nelson mandella's work inform you? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movemented and his struggle? >> well, the leadership, the commitment, the dedication, the ings prags of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember as a young student in 1962, '63 and '64, we said if nelson mandella can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. when i met him for the first time, he said to me john lewis, i know all about you. i followed you. >> it was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. the struggle in birmingham is inseparable. trying to understand the importance of those decisions after sharkville, when they decided that nonviolence wasn't enough, they had committed to nonviolence in a way that you had been so committed tlot your life and they decided that they needed that response, as well. how international were those discussions? >> here in america and around the world, there was on going discuss
. >>> four u.s. presidents are headed to south africa to pay final respects to civil rights legend nelson mandela. president obama and first lady michelle obama departed on air force one just a short time ago. tomorrow's memorial service will also serve as a rare reunion for nearly all of the living american presidents. >>> kpix5cate courigan is in the news room. a real security challenge. >> reporter: 8000 mourners are expected to attend the memorial and authorities say thousands of police officers will be on hand. right now, a memorial outside of mandela's former home is growing as well as a crowd of south africa's that have come together since the death. >> police are preparing today for a memorial service for nelson mandela at a johannesburg soccer stadium. president obama leaves this morning for south africa where he'll attend the massive public memorial. former president's bush, clinton and carter will also be in attendance along with more than 50 heads of state, making it one of the largest gatherings of world leaders in recent history. >> this is a test for us. >> reporter: the he
's incomparable. one of us that grew up in the post-civil rights era it tempered a lot of us that got to know him. the mandela way was not only to fight for change but become the change and he symbolized that in epic proportions. few times i was honored to be around him, you were always moved by this balance of gravity and humility, you never saw in anyone else. he was such a humble and great guy at the same time. it is really something that we probably, president obama said, we'll never see again. >> john meacham, i was talking to my 10-year-old girl about nelson mandela, explaining about him, what he had done, the sacrifices he made, the way he changed this country and the world. i'm wondering, though, of course, my 10-year-old girl didn't know an awful lot about nelson mandela. and we won't even talk about my 5-year-old boy. he'll get it in years to come. what do history books write about this man? >> the last lines of the 20th century. he was arguably with john paul ii, martin luther king, he was someone without whom the world would be radically different and worse. while america mourns him t
washington. >>> president obama is making a long trip from washington to south africa to honor civil rights legend nelson mandela. tomorrows memorial service will serve as a rare reunion of nearly all of the living american presidents. kpix5 is in the news room now and the number of dig any tar its i imagine is giving south african police quite a security challenge. >> reporter: yes, frank. more than 80,000 mourners are expected to attend the memorial and thousands of police officers will be on hand and right now a memorial outside nelson mandela's former home is growing as well as a crowd of south africans who have come together since his death. >> police are preparing today for a memorial service for nelson mandela at a soccer stadium tomorrow. president obama leaves this morning for south africa where he will attend the massive public memorial. former presidents bush, clinton and carter will also be in attendance along with more than 50 heads of state, making it one of the largest gatherings the world leaders in recent history. >> this is a test for us. >> the head of south africa's nati
among some of the biggest civil right ises advocates. brown hosted him in his civil rights tour after he got out of prison. >> mandela came here in 1990, and 70,000 packed into the coliseum to see their hero and receive thanks for his activism. >> it is you, the people of the bay area, who have given me and my dedication hopes to continue to prosper. >> the bay area choir who performed for him in south africa
than that. last year they were making san francisco the rights to civil council city, the city of gideon. there are civil cases, eviction cases, family law cases where the consequences, the results followed in court are almost as severe to what gideon faced and what people face in criminal cases. what we recognize at the outset of the supervisors proclamation is part inspirational, our leaders in the community have rallied around it and the bar association and our firms have taken on more conviction cases. later we'll be holding an event to thank people in these positions and so please stay tuned about that. in the meantime let's focus on gideon and the public defenders role. i would say if there is ever a time and place to turn the tied and to bring the &m music back to gideon's trumpet. we thank you and look forward to a great day. thank you. [ applause ] >> about a year-and-a-half go we saw one of the most dramatic shifts when the state took funding and reallocated to local and housing for state prisoners. our next speaker chief probation officers not only in san francisco
. there is nothing civil about letting somebody without their right mind decompensate to the to point that they lose their lives and sometimes other people lose their lives. our mother recently had called me and said that her son had been on the streets because he also left their house and the police called her first thing in the morning. she hadn't seen him in a long time and he had paranoid schizophrenia. they said your son is in the hospital. we arrested him on a 51/50. he was walking naked in the street in the middle of the night talking to himself. the mother and father jumped in the car and went to the emergency room and by the time they got there, the hospital had released him. i don't understand this. it's just, you know, i'm not a lawyer and i wasn't in the mental health field before, i just, i don't understand it. the qualifications and criteria for a holder extreme and they are unrealistic. a person much be imminently danger to self or others or gravely disabled before they are picked up. if your shelter is under a freeway, if he knows of a garbage can that he can frequent, he's not grave
, because the first weekend in july 50 years ago was when the civil rights act of 1964 was signed. >> wow. >> and so we will be back the first week in july 50 years later, and we will recommit ourselves to that purpose of that civil rights opportunity act. so we're excited. >> now, we got it's the 20th anniversary. it's going to be around voting 50 years after the civil rights act. but one thing that is always off the chain is the entertainment. but i said that there's no way you could beat last year because you had beyonce. but you did. we're announcing tonight you have prince next year. >> prince will headline our essence festival for 2014. he was our headliner ten years ago for the tenth anniversary, and he is back. we are honored, excited, and even more emboldened than ever that this will be the biggest party and will position us to achieve our purpose in 2014. >> as you look back as someone that wasn't around when essence was founded and you see where we are today in the midst of this is the middle of the second term of the first african-american president, you're hosting such a huge
of the people. and somehow the movement here, the civil rights movement in our country deserves much credit for the change we now see in america, and in south africa. >> well, and reverend, to that point, that's why it is so interesting -- i think, and potentially enlightening, to see some of the political debate playing out more among republicans. but take a listen to more from former speaker newt gingrich, in doing what rick hertzburg was doing, embracing as a founding father in politics, one of the best things you could say about someone. take a listen. >> posted my statement on her facebook page and was amazed at some of the intensity, some of whom came back three and four and five times, repeating how angry they were. so i wrote my newsletter on friday, basically entitled it, "what would you have done." >> and he goes on to talk about what the legacy of mandela is being a revolutionary and freedom fighter and also a patriot. how do you looking at this now, national/international conversation, how do you think we're doing in remembering our history accurately with apartheid as a foreign
is really a civil right and it really effects our people that we serve in the independent resource center and i wanted to mention a couple of points. one is the prohibition against the people that receive ssa, from receiving the food stamps and really impacts the seniors and the people with disabilities, disproportionally, it is a major issue that really needs to be addressed and i hope is that through this process, san francisco can start to take steps to address this very important issue. i also want to say that many years ago, i have first hand experience with having the difficulty getting food, i was on ssi and so, this was many years ago but i have and i carry with me the memories of how difficult it was just to survive and to eat a proper meal i have a relative who is helpless in san francisco and he has moved to the mental health disability and when i was young he helped my mom take care of me and make sure that i was able to function throughout and growing up. and i am not able to help him now. but, what i am here to do today, is to ask, to remember, all of the people that are not
property today, have it inspected, and make the changes because this is a civil rights statute. it is the same thing as discrimination based on race, and it is treated the same way in the courts. >> i heard the previous speaker make some good points about be a pro are the -- proactive about getting a task inspector before you get sued. i am f. task inspector. if you have to cut -- heard the term thrown around, inspection created by our state senators, and it is really great information out there that i want to encourage everyone. i will not be able to go into extensive details, but i will be able to tell you a little bit of what is involved. the difference is in the california building code. i can also give you tips on how to choose and specter appeared first of all, the program has an inspector's knowledge of the california building code, and the reason why that is so important is because you have to comply with both. the california billing code is enforced when you get a building permit, and forced by the local building requirements. it says all new buildings have to be total
a dream. some say nelson mandela dreamed it. he became one of the greatest civil rights icons of the last 50 years and it cost him almost three decades of his life in a jail cell. vanita on the man who earned the admiration of millions. >> and one wonders what must be passing through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> after 27 years in prison, nelson mandela walked into freedom. against all odds, the leader of a rebellion became the leader of national unity. mandela's decade-long rebellion turned him into a freedom fighter, an international hero. >> i fought against white domination. i have fought for every family. >> mandela was born into a privileged family. he supported nonviolence. he became a lawyer and opened the first african law firm. in 1960, mandela turned militant. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless for us to continue talking nonviolence. >> mandela loved up to his name, troublemaker, repeatedly challenging authority. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentence to life in prison. he was cut off from the outside
respects to a civil rights icon. how the family of nelson mandela is comforting mourners at his home. >>> and the cold snap, a warning for sierra drivers a and how long the freeze warning will last for the bay area. >>> nbc bay area news starts now. >>> good evening, i'm diane dwyer. and we start with a developing story, the 85-year-old palo alto man held in north korea is free tonight, back in the bay area. nbc's bay area kimberly terry has more on the newly released photo of him, kimberly? >> reporter: that is right, dianna, happy to be home, we want to show you the photo of merrill newman and his wife, happy at home. he says he is truly grateful for all the support he and his family have received during this ordeal. korean war veteran merrill newman arrived at san francisco international airport to a group of media. he held hands with his wife, lee, and his son, jeff, was beside him. >> good morning, i'm delighted to be home. i want to thank the swedish embassy in korea. >> reporter: he was released with humanitarian gesture, based on his age. >> it is a great homecoming, and i'm
this is a federal civil rights complaint under section 1983. do you see the elements of that kind of case here? >> i really do. whether or not you can prevail, it's a long road to prevail but in these cases where you have police officers aking under color of authority with clear information that should indicate that the people that they are about to arrest have not committed a crime it's when you cross that barrier of judgment that the courts have taken a dim view of that kind of police conduct. if the students and coach told the police officers and then they effectuated an arrest, those are facts that can prevail in civil right cases in federal courts. >> in a case like this, is it the coach who would have more credibility than the students or is it the combination of what you can prove to be the actual truth of the students' position which is that they are waiting if a bus which is scheduled and it's a school bus. the combination of the credibility factors there, how would you weigh them? >> you would hope that the students' statements in and of themselves would be enough. it's 8:30 in the morning
officers and then they effectuated an arrest, those are facts that can prevail in civil right cases in federal courts. >> in a case like this, is it the coach who would have more credibility than the students or is it the combination of what you can prove to be the actual truth of the students' position which is that they are waiting if a bus which is scheduled and it's a school bus. the combination of the credibility factors there, how would you weigh them? >> you would hope that the students' statements in and of themselves would be enough. it's 8:30 in the morning on the day before thanksgiving on a quiet street. their statements should be enough. you add in their coach. that's a troubling case. if i was a law enforcement in rochester i would be thinking about issuing apologies and dismissing charges. >> thank you very much for joining us tonight. >> thank you. >> coming up, a 13-year-old gives a speech about marriage equality and he does it at his bar mitzvah. [ male announcer] surprise -- you're having triplets. [ babies crying ] surprise -- your house was built on an ancient b
midnight in south africa, the president made the announcement the civil rights icon and leader to the world had passed. >> i'm shere shepherd smith in york. we have learn ed from the president of south africa that the civil rights icon nelson mandela died a short time ago at the age of 95. mandela was the first black president of south africa and an enduring icon of the struggle against racial opposition. he died according to the announcement of the governor leaving the nation without the moral center at a time of growing dissatisfaction with the country's leaders. those words lead the new york sometimes article that came out moments ago. mr. mandela spent 27 years in prison after being convicted of treason. by negotiating with captors after his release in 1990, mandela led the african national congress long a banned liberation movement to an lek to recall victory in 1994, first fully democratic election in that country's history. the new york times goes on, mandela served one term as the president and had not been seen in public since the year 2010 when the nation hosted the world cup socc
't remember much about the civil rights movement don't remember much about his life. they know what he stood for. i think, you know, today in south africa, even when people wake up in the morning because most people don't know he's transitioned and i use that word because in south africa, people don't talk about death and dying. they talk about transitioning and it's a happy time, and i'm sure they're going to be celebrating his life. i hope they will be teaching, teaching, teaching what nelson mandela stood for. this is a moment to teach. it's a teachable moment. as much as it is a moment to reflect and think about what nelson mandela has meant to the world and to these young people who can sing in that neighborhood where they used to not even be able to go without a pass, the black ones. it's that kind of thing that nelson mandela did away with that we need to remember. those young people could not have gone into that neighborhood a this time of night without a pass before nelson mandela and his people liberated the country. so that's what they're, you know, representing now. >> charlayne,
as a memorial, cars and candles in honor of the civil rights leader and politician who passed away at the aim -- age of 95. >> republican to's embattled mayor is criticizing president obama. mayor ford is denowing the health care laissezzing affordable care -- saying affordable care act is too expensive in spite of california having a government-run health care system. as a person, he said, i live but i don't like his policies. >> if you are looking for a perfect gift, california officials have a suggestion, health insurance. the sack -- "sacramento bee" says "give the gift of health aimed at mothers and grandmothers would could look to buy health insurance for uninsured young adults. >> some are sounding off as a new baby bouncy seat with an ipad holder. the company released this video showing how it works. they are selling the app for $80 and says it offers play and learning at a baby's fingertips but some are disgusted. shoppers on amazon have called it "one of the worst ideas for baby products." >> amazon is widely expected to lunch a new delivery service next week for groceries. all sign
mandela. how the son of another civil rights icon is help remembering a man who helped end apartheid. 'y and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. [ mthat if you wear a partial,w you're almost twice as likely to lose your supporting teeth? try poligrip for partials. poligrip helps minimize stress which may damage supporting teeth by stabilizing your partial. care for your partial. help protect your natural teeth. >>> former presidents george w. bush and bill clinton will join president obama at a memorial for nelson mandela next week as south africa mourns its former president's death. crowds outside his johannesburg home are singing their tributes. ♪ hundreds of people of all ages and co
on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. >>> poet author and civil rights pioneer maya angelou needs little person son fied. she wrote and had a tribute to nelson mandela. the white house tweeted it out. here is an excerpt. >> his day is done, done. his wings came on a day reluctant to carry his burden. nelson mandela's day is done. no sun out lasts it's sunset but will raise again and bring the dawn. nelson mandela's day is done. we confess it in tearful voices, yet, we lift our own to say thank you, thank you our david, our great courageous man. we will not forget you. we will not dishonor you. we will remember and be glad that you lived among us, that you taught us, and that you loved us, all. >> i spoke with dr. maya angelou shortly before air time. dr. angelou, i watched the poem you wrote and recited and one of the things you struck me, you refer to him as david, not just south africa's david out our david, our david and our giddian. >> a man, a woman we can all be that particular person who has enough courage to stand up and say i am one. i have enough courage to dare to be a
civil disobedience. >> right, and i think the thing that's missing in a lot of this presentation, anderson, is that a lot of south africans died because of the resistant of the apartheid system to integration and liberation of africans in south africa. i think when we think about folks that lost their lives, it's a shameless act of the powers in south africa. one -- there were only 10% of the population but controlled 90% of the population. i think that it's important we talk about this fact, they were fighting a battle trying to end apartheid, trying to make sure everybody could be treated and nelson mandela was a symbol. he said i want everybody to come to the table, everybody to be a part of the new south of ka and everybody to vote. that's why he was elected not as the first african elected but the first democratically elected president of south africa. that's important. democracy and justice ask truth made a big difference. >> robin, i keep coming back to this and mentioned a couple times, i'm fascinated how he began to see himself and it was critical for him to see -- start
for a real ak-47. the lopez family since filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the deputy and the department claiming that shooting was unjustified. the santa rosa police department in the meantime is still investigating. the county board of supervisors meeting starts at 8:30 this morning, along with appointing members to this community and law enforcement task force, supervisors also are expected to decide whether to explore the creation of a memorial park at the site where andy lopez was killed. the field where he was shot back in october. that meeting, again, starts at 8:30 this morning. live this morning in santa rosa, alex savidge ktvu channel 2 news. >>> time now 5:06. 9-1-1 calls made during the sandy hook elementary school shooting rampage will be released tomorrow. connecticut state attorney had been fighting against releasing those recordings saying the recordings of seven calls made from inside the school would be painful for the victims' families. now he says he won't challenge a judge's decision to make the calls public. last december a gunman shot and killed
influenced civil rights leaders here and his complicated relationship with the united states. >>> also at this hour, on the record right now, president obama is wrapping up remarks about israel during a time of tension over iran. these are some live pictures. the president literally just wrapping up. more from the white house. >>> and the budget breakthrough, a rare bipartisan plan is in the works right now. i'll ask a gop congresswoman if they'll make deadline day. >>> there will be a lot of friendships made and other kids will have a friend to play with. >> and the buddy bench. one second-grader's idea to solve loneliness is today's big idea. a lot to get to. >>> we start this hour with the release of 85-year-old american veteran merrill newman. newman arrived at san francisco international airport about two hours ago to applause. he was holding his wife's hand. the north korean government released newman late last night. they'd been holding him in the country since october. as you might imagine, newman says he is thrilled to be home. >> it's been a great homecoming. and i'm tired bu
's airsoft bb gun for a real ak-47. lopez's family has filed a civil rights lawsuit against the deputy and the department claiming that shooting was unjustified. the santa rosa police department in the meantime is still investigating, and this county board of supervisors meeting will begin later on this morning at 8:30, and that's when they will take up this issue over the task force. it's a community and law enforcement task force that again will be appointed later on today here in santa rosa. live this morning in santa rosa, alex savidge ktvu channel 2 news. >>> thank you. new this morning, police have tracked down a teenage boy who escaped from san fransisco's juvenile detention center. officers took the 17-year-old boy into custody on treasure island late last night. several hours after his escape. there's no word on why the boy was in juvenile hall or exactly how officers found him. >>> this morning emergency crews in idaho hope to resume the search for a san jose pilot and his four passengers. air traffic controllers lost contact with their plane sunday as the pilot was attemptin
and the city of concord for wrongful arrest and excessive force federal civil rights violations. concord city attorney says he doesn't comment on pending litigation but that the city will defend the lawsuit. joe vazquez, kpix 5. >>> judy rogers the chef and co- ownerrer of sunni cafe died from cancer on monday night. the market street restaurant was packed last night as you can see. rogers worked at zuni for more than 25 years. she wontons of awards. but she was most famous -- she won tons of award but she was most famous for her roast chicken. >> i'll miss her. she had a big heart. she was compassionate, kind and strong. >> employees put up pictures and cards thanking rogers for being a good friend and mentor. she was 57. >>> a new clue in the search for a missing san jose pilot and his family. betty yu reports. >> reporter: the smiths are a tight-knit mormon family. after spending thanksgiving weekend in oregon, silicon valley executive dale smith left for montana. his son daniel and his son's wife, his daughter amber and her fiance were in his beech bonanza similar to this one. it ran into
. >> this announcement made this afternoon by the south african president jacob assume zuma. >> the civil rights legend passed away at age 95. mandela had become a symbol of triumph after spending 27 years in prison trying to end racial and political segregation in his country. >> i have cherished the idea of a democratic and free society. it is an idea for when ch i am prepared to die. >> nelson mandela was the country's first black president just as president obama was the first in the united states the two did meet face-to-face, but not while leaders today, president obama says nelson mandela was his inspiration. >> today, he's gone home we've lost one of the most influential, and pro foundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> president obama is expected to travel to south after rick why for the funeral. >> this is a scene just minutes ago in south africa. a crowd gathered outside of nelson mandel' home. some have put on the south african flag during this remembrance. >> the impact on his country cannot be over
citizens should also mention that this movement has a lot of support might get lots of civil rights groups community leaders even when you're sitting here at lax fields of law seo has voiced his support for reducing the minimum wage as you can see this is that fuel which movements in the united states taking place in day out the extent they're going from location to location and name calling them as they continue walking. reporting from the dark green up when i r t. rapper great scientists and rescue crews are desperately attempting to save the crew of beached whales. the group of pilot whales is stranded off the shoreline of everglades national park in southern florida. at least ten whales have ninety six of natural causes and four of them were euthanized. for more from florida. rt is an incline so donovan reports. the last couple of days of being very sad day this to be down here on the shoals of the southern florida on wednesday the whole the news spread out but the very large group of up to forty five pilot whales stranded themselves off the shoals of the candidates national park. mari
to civil rights legend nelson mandela. yesterday was a national day of prayer for the activist who died thursday at the age of 95. at one ceremony mandela was remembered by the man who succeeded him as south africa's president. >> what inspired by what he and his generation were able to do, for millions of our people, to engage in struggle, to end in justice. >> president obama and first lady michelle obama will attend a public memorial service for mandela tomorrow. former president jimmy carter, bill clinton and george w. bush also plan to attend with their wives. then mandela's body will lie in state for three days before his burial. >> mr. mandela is also being remembered in the bay area. kpix5 shows us the celebration of mandela's life and legacy at a bay area church. >> reporter: when san francisco's glide memorial church remembered nelson mandela at their morning services the only thing missing was sadness. the mood was joyful as a children's choir honored the passing of the man being called the father of a nation. >> it's bigger than that. i mean, nelson mandela touched all of ou
by hard it's been because stuff that's worth it is always hard. the civil rights movement was hard. get women the right to vote, that was hard. making sure that workers have the right to organize, that was hard. you know, it's never been easy for us to change how we do business in this country. this has been the case for social security, for medicare, for all of the great social progress that we've made in this country. >> krystal, it sounds like he's trying to get them to remember the reason they got involved in his presidential campaign. >> yeah, i think so. and i think it's important that we keep the perspective on why it's taken so long to reform our health insurance. it is because it's hard and there are parts that are disruptive and it makes people uncomfortable but ultimately we have put our faith and trust in this law and in this president and i think we're going to be better off for it. >> zeke emanuel and krystal ball, thank you. >>> coming up, a last word exclusive, those three high school athletes who were arrested in rochester, new york, this week while they were waiting fo
, this couple. >> they filed a complaint. >> what happens now? >> the office of civil rights is going to look at that complaint and see if his civil rights were denied. by denying him the transplant, were they denying it because of his disability. if they find that he was, it's going to be a problem for the hospital. >> thanks so much. we'll be right back. across the country has brought me to the lovely city of boston. cheers. and seeing as it's such a historic city, i'm sure they'll appreciate that geico's been saving people money for over 75 years. oh... dear, i've dropped my tea into the boston harbor. huhh... i guess this party's over. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. for aveeno® positively radiant face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] aveeno® with soy helps reduce the look of brown spots in 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. aveeno®. naturally beautiful results. aveeno®. so when my moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis them. was also on display, i'd had it. i finally had a serious talk with my dermatologist. this time, he prescrib
in charge. we saw that here in this country post-civil rights movement where -- there's a wonderful book i think about often about a small town and southern georgia, the civil rights movement came late to the county and those who sort of really were in opposition to the sheriff and ultimate power, how difficult, difficulty they had once they had any kind of power. and so i guess i wonder why, what happened? >> it's the big question in a place like this. obviously, people came back from 30 years in exile come in the case of the successor to nelson mandela in 1999. mostly living in london. and all of a sudden in charge of running a country that he didn't know that he left as a young man of 19, coming back and needing to run the place that was bankrupt the he described former president described walking into the office in union buildings after being sworn in and finding nothing. no computers, no pencils, no pins. no paper, and which to manage this developing country. so i think part of it is that that generation came back from exile to a country they did know. and that the presidency is in ha
civil rights movement and then he was on the side of civil rights and then it got all complicated with affirmative action and bussing and sanctions he said made it all clear again. he stood up again against the president. i was covering the white house then and occasionally they would bring in small groups of reporters to chat with the president on the theor theory w each other. it was during this period the president said more black people drive and own cars in south africa than there are cars in the soviet union and to him that sort of rationalized, this was, you know, communism is the evil system. and you had po to do everything to stand up to communism. i remember clearly he reached for two cookies and said he had half a sandwich for lunch. pat buchanon was a speech writer in the white house then. i recalled this memory to him. he said he wrote that lean. he got it from commentary magazine. he said reagan loved it but the secretary of state george schultz was furious at him for putting it in. it made if president look like simpleton. >> but that was a part, anything that could
civil rights movement and after the vietnam war movement, college campuses in the 80s erupted over the apartheid movement. the administration of ronald reagan finally was the first veto override on foreign policy. it was rejected and taken over as jim baker said on "morning joe." taken over by congress. >> why do you think the world was slow when it came to dealing with south africa? >> i have to say that we in the media are partly to blame. we didn't focus that much on what was going on in south africa. until it just became impossible to ignore. when i went the first time in 1985, it was actually the first time that we focused on the people of south africa. both the black and the white and what the human beings of the country were thinking. why the white people thought they were superior to the blacks and did they ever see an end to that thinking? how the blacks were struggling on every level, not just in the streets, but offices where many of them worked. it was initially focusing on the overall idea of those who are fighting against oppression and those who are pressing. we didn
these struggles were and how to fight opposition. i mean, i've been in the civil rights fight for the last several decades. and i remember the beginnings of the fight against apartheid here. robinson and gray and others who were castigated and attacked for that. and they were able to turn public opinion around. having to fight people like dick cheney and others who are now with these great eulogies on nelson mandela. >> that's right. i think people forget that. when people like you and mary francis berry were in the beginning of that fight, it was demonized and you were attacked for that. and it was not a popular position. and so i think there's a lot about the history that people. he oversimplifies everything. so does rush limbaugh. they don't care about what the facts are. that is here is a man who stood for justice, stood for freedom, stood for equality. we have a president who seems to -- i'm not saying he is nelson mandela, but he seems to be trying to accomplish some of the same things. >> karen finney, well, he's getting called some of the same names. thank you for your time tonight. be sur
that there is true freedom in forgiveness. >>> joining me now, civil rights leader and president of the rainbow push coalition, reverend jesse jackson. awfully glad to speak with you. you listened to president clinton. do you agree he belongs in the statues of history with gandhi, martin luther king jr. if not maybe at the top of the list? >> external persecution and the wil will, dignity. they were driven by their suffering. you define them by what they did with the pain. that is to say when mr. mandela chose to use his pain for transformation. to use his pain for reconciliation, revenge or retaliation it took him to different level. >> what was it like to be in the same room as he was. oftentimes there are leaders -- and i will say this is applied to you as well. there are some people you think they take up all the energy because there's something about them. he must have had that as well. >> well, he did have a personal magnetism. i remember the first sunday he came out of jail in cape town at south africa at city hall. he walked in the room. having been in jail for 27 years, so aware and so aler
of nelson mandela. >> the civil rights icon has 17 grandchildren, some of whom opened up in a rare interview with abc's rina ninan. >> reporter: set free after 27 years in prison. >> first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: some of his grandchildren found themselves longing for his prison days. >> those days i cherished because it was just the two of no one else. when he came out we did not have him because he had bigger issues to tackle. >> reporter: his grandson remembers visiting him when he was 4. >> he asked the wardens if he could put cartoons on the tv so me and my other cousins could sit and watch them and he offered us hot chocolate and he made it himself. >> reporter: his granddaughter said that while he couldn't physically touch them, his words always did. >> at the end of the visit he brought me a box of chocolates saying your visit will always be a bittersweet memory for me. >> reporter: words in the form of letters written to the family from jail. this one describing the moment that he was told his son was killed in a car accident. >> it describes his heart seems to st
to create the santa clausification of rosa parks and martin luther king jr. and other civil rights leaders. they are cast as figures with no history or context, just celebrated as the good guys who fought the forces of evil. consider the 2005 eulogy for parks from bill frist, flagged today. frisk said it was "not an intentional attempt to change a nation but a singular act aimed at restoring the dignity of the individual." and that gets it exactly wrong. rosa parks was an actual human being who was embedded in a whole bunch of institutions and organizations that were very much trying to change the nation. she was part of not just the liberal left, but the radical left. she trained at the highlander folk school in tennessitennesse legendary leftist training guard regarded as a communist training school by southern segregationist. she was secretary of the montgomery naacp when arrested, an organization with deep roots in the city's trade union movement, which it helped organize her protest. she years earlier helped organize a campaign for young african-americans to borrow books from whites-o
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